As of last week — March 14 to be precise — I’ve been writing about wine for 14 years and just about all of that has focused on New York and Long Island wine.

What a long strange trip it’s been — both for me, and for Long Island wine in that period.

When I first visited Long Island wine country just a few weeks after moving here for a job almost two decades ago, I wasn’t long out of graduate school. At the time, I guess you could have called, mostly because I thought it was a grown-up alternative to cheap beer. But like many underemployed grad students, I mostly drank cheap stuff — stuff that I now know was probably factory-made and definitely wasn’t very good. I remember drinking a lot of Australian wine with animals on the label. Blue Marlin Chardonnay was a favorite. I had very little experience with Old World wines, save Beaujolais nouveau at Thanksgiving — another wine I rarely drink today.

I had yet to taste many great wines of the world, or even the United States. I wasn’t unlike the average person walking into a North Fork tasting room, probably.

I remember, while touring Long Island Wine County those first few times, hearing two phrases over and over: “Bordeaux-style reds” and “Burgundian Chardonnay.” I feigned understanding at the time, not wanting to admit that I had no idea what they were talking about. I nodded politely and listened to tales about soils and climate and malolactic fermentation.

But the fact is, I really had no idea what they were talking about. They might as well have said “Martian-style Merlot.” It would have meant as much.

All these years later, wine has become my primary hobby, an obsession really. I’ve explored Bordeaux — not first-growths maybe (because who can really afford those today?), but some very good wines. I’ve tasted white Burgundy, too. Enough to understand the style and realize that most domestic Chardonnay doesn’t come close.

Looking back, it’s easier to understand what Long Island wineries were really trying to tell me.

By comparing their reds to Bordeaux, they really meant “We’re not like California.” And at the time, that was an important differentiation for drinkers coming in looking for plush California-style Cabernet. And by saying “Burgundian chardonnay” they meant “plenty of oak, but not like California.”

There probably were at least a few wines back then — and there certainly are today — reminiscent of classic Merlot and Chardonnay from the Old World, but most did, and still do, fall short.

Maybe short isn’t the right word, though.

Long Island wine shouldn’t taste like wine from California or Bordeaux or the Loire Valley or anywhere else except Long Island. It is the comparisons that are lacking, not Long Island wine.

The greatest development in the Long Island wine industry over the past five to 10 years is a turn away from these comparisons. You almost never hear them anymore. And the winemaking reflects that, too. Winemakers aren’t beating the Cabernet Franc-iness out of their Cabernet Franc as much. Barrel-fermented Chardonnay isn’t as overtly oaky anymore. And while Merlot and Chardonnay still dominate plantings, varieties like Albariño are on the rise as growers explore Long Island’s terroir further.

Winemakers — the good ones, anyway — have realized just how good Long Island wine is when it’s allowed to express itself as itself.

Long Island wine is more comfortable in its own skin today than it was when I first started drinking and then writing about it.

My wife framed the first print story I ever wrote about wine — but it’s in our basement collecting dust. It was a story about local dessert wines and in the very first paragraph I referenced “Port from Spain.” Port isn’t made in Spain, of course. It comes from Portugal. I still cringe every time I see it. I guess I’ve come a long way since those days, too.

A version of this story first ran in the Suffolk Times/northforker.com

About Author

Lenn Thompson, a proud Pittsburgh, PA native, moved to Long Island more than a decade ago and quickly fell in love with the region’s dynamic and emerging wine community. A digital and content marketing and community professional by day, he founded NewYorkCorkReport.com in early 2004 to share his passion for the wines, beers and spirits of New York State. After running that site -- which became the premier source for independent New York wine commentary, reviews and news -- for 12 years, he launched TheCorkReport.us in late 2016 to add the wines of Virginia, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Vermont and beyond to his beat. Lenn currently serves as the wine columnist for The Suffolk Times weekly newspaper and is the former editor of the Long Island Wine Gazette. He contributes or has contributed to publications like Wine Enthusiast Magazine, Beverage Media, Edible Brooklyn, Edible East End and Edible Hudson Valley. Lenn served on the board of directors for Drink Local Wine, and is the creator and founder of TasteCamp, an annual regional wine immersion conference for writers and trade. An admitted riesling and cabernet franc fanatic, he’s intensely passionate about eating local and the many local wine regions of America. Lenn lives in Miller Place, NY with his wife Nena, son Jackson, daughter Anna and their dog, Casey Lemieux Thompson.

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